Aviation Headsets

© Brooke Clarke 2019

Helmet, Summer,
                  Flying Type A-10A Astrocom Aviation
                  headset David Clark
                  H10-76 headset

Background
Models
    Helmet, Summer, Flying Type A-10A
        Why the kamikaze pilots wore helmets
Photos
Patents
Related
References
Links

Background

These aviation headsets have a lot in common with the Military Audio Accessories typically used by the Army, but incorporate special features related to aviation use.

Models

Helmet, Summer, Flying Type A-10A

Got this as an illustration for answering the below question about Kamikaze pilots wearing helmets.

Marked: Helmet, Summer, Flying Type A-10A, Spec. No. 3230-B, Amend. 1, Large, s/n: 8300-416590, P.O. AF.33(033)11009, Lite Mfg. Co. Inc
These accept the ANB-H-1 receivers.  Prior flying helmets had provision for Gosport speaking tubes (Wiki) which only work when there are two people in the plane, like a trainer.  Obviously speaking tubes have no function in a single seat plane.

Photos

Fig 1 (using Fire alarm bell as head)
Helmet,
                      Summer, Flying Type A-10A
Fig 2 Label is inside at top.
Chamois ear pads missing.
Helmet,
                      Summer, Flying Type A-10A

Ref: Allied Flight Gear: USAAF Flight Helmets -

Why the kamikaze pilots wore helmets.

 72nd Shinbu 1945 Kamikazes (from Wiki)
From Wiki Kamikaze web page.
You can see the headphones


In the recent past there was some discussion as to what good it would do to have a canvas flying helmet when the plane crashes.  I'm sure the answer is that this "helmet" has no safety function.

American pilots wore a very similar thing for the same reason (I had one when in grade school): to hold their earphones and block noise.
Conventional headphones use straps over the top of the head and depend on gravity.  That does not work in a airplane.  The HS-30 is a W.W.II vintage headset that might or might not stay put during aircraft manoeuvres but does nothing to block noise.

Note it's very noisy in a W.W.II airplane and so headphones like the Trimm Featherweight would do nothing to block the sound.  The David Clark Company was founded not on making earphones but rather on making ear protectors that are very good at blocking noise.
Some modern headphone,s like the H-161 , surround the ear and are designed to block outside noise as are theDavid Clark or Astrocom brand aircraft headsets.
If you look closely at the W.W.II pilot "helmet" you will see it has a large noise blocking rubber part surrounding the hole for the actual ANB-H-1 type speaker elements.
Ref: Allied Flight Gear: USAAF flight helmets -

Astrocom

This headset is a combination of a bunch of Astrocom part numbers and other manufacture's part numbers.

Fig 1
Astrocom
                      Aviation headset

David Clark

H10-76

Fig 1
David
                      Clark H10-76 headset
Fig 2 David Clark Company Inc.    Model H10-76
Worcester, MA USA   FAA TS) CSZ , C58, CAT. B   Wt. 19Oz.  p/n18284G-01
Mfr: 71483   NSN: 5965-01-390-9240  P/N 12510G-21   Made in U.S.A.
U.S. Patent Nos. 351390, 5138722
David
                      Clark H10-76 headset
Fig 3

Gentex Corporation

Incorporate headsets into their helmets.

Patents

David Clark

2899683 Ear protectors, William B Wadsworth, Forrest R Poole, David Clark Co Inc, 1959-08-18 - Muff type rather than plug type.
2902692 Ear protector, , David M Clark, David Clark Co Inc,
2946862 Ear protector and communication equipment, William B Wadsworth, Forrest R Poole, David Clark Co Inc, 1960-07-26 - Muff type rather than plug type.
2981958 Ear protector, William B Wadsworth, Forrest R Poole, David Clark Co Inc, 1961-05-02 - "A further object of the invention resides in the provision of an ear protector which utilizes a completely new principle of acoustics which is briefly that using a hollow rigid body, the attenuation of sound is increased by relatively increasing the volume of the hollow body with reference to the size of a hole, in the body which is applied to the ear; in other words, the smaller the hole applied to the ear, with a given volume for the rigid ear protector, the greater is the attenuation of sound, particularly in the low ranges, but at all frequencies."
3051961 Ear protctor and seal therefor, David M Clark, David Clark Co Inc, 1962-09-04
3098121 Automatic sound control, William B Wadsworth, David Clark Co Inc, 1963-07-16 - AVC based on ambient sound
3134456 Wide range communication and sound attenuation device, William B Wadsworth, David Clark Co Inc, 1964-05-26 - includes speaker to make headphones.
3432861 Ear protector, John E Flagg, David Clark Co Inc, 1969-03-18 - adding internal ridges to stiffen shell gives more attenuation.
4987592 Microphone boom assembly for communication headset, John E. Flagg, David Clark Co Inc, 1991-01-22 -
5138722 Headset ear seal, Richard M. Urella, William B. Van Lennep, David Clark Co Inc, 1992-08-18 - plots of various materials
5185807 Headset with multi-position stirrup assemblies, James T. Bergin, Richard M. Urella, David Clark Co Inc, 1993-02-09 - ear cups can pivot left-right and up-down.
5322245 Integrated pilot protective and restraint system, John W. Bassick, David Clark Co Inc, 1994-06-21 - restraint system, not audio
D351390 Cushioned headband, Richard M. Urella, Glen A. Davis, David Clark Co Inc, 1994-10-11 -
5590213 Headset with adjustable headpad, Richard M. Urella, Glen A. Davis,  David Clark Co Inc, 1996-12-31 -
5821468 Laminated nap comfort cover for ear seal, Richard M. Urella, Robert E. Dalbec, Domenic L. Fratantonio, David Clark Co Inc, 1998-10-13 -
5911314 Headset ear seal, Richard M. Urella, Robert E. Dalbec, Louis J. Kiwak, David Clark Co Inc, 1999-06-15 -
6684976 Headset ear seal, Allan E. Sheppard, Jr., David Clark Co Inc, 2004-02-03 -

Related


References


Links

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Page Created 2019 July 30